​​​​​​​​     Trump Score Card

JOBS :  A+






As President Trump became the 45th President of the United States, the American job market saw a record high 95,102,000 Americans not in labor force. The number grew 18% since Obama first took office in 2009. So what will President Trump do to fix this?


Bringing jobs back to America was arguably the most effective of all of Donald Trump's campaign messages. This was proven by his incredibly impressive victories in the Rust Belt where he won the states of Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. The three latter states were previously dominated by the Democrat Presidents over the last 20 - 30 years.  


The latest statistics under President Trump shows U.S. jobless claims at lowest level in more than 28 years, the number of employed Americans at a record high of 153,513,000, over 1 million new jobs were created and unemployment is at a 16 year low.


1/24/17: President Donald Trump signed an executive order advancing the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. A project, which has been on the shelf for more than four years due to federal government deliberations and eventual rejection. The arguments in favor of the pipeline, many of which President Trump has touted, includes job creation. In fact most experts predict tens of thousands of new jobs. It was also reported that the Dakota Access Pipeline expected to bring $100M a year to North Dakota.


2/16/16: President Donald J. Trump signed legislation to stop the costly “Stream Protection Rule” from further harming coal workers and the communities that depend on them. Keeping one of his campaign promises to the Rust Belt of America (who was the deciding factor in the Presidential Election) Donald Trump cut overly burdensome regulation from harming the coal industry which will ultimately save tens of thousands of jobs. Since January 2009, the coal mining industry had lost over 36,000 jobs without any relief in sight. From 2009 to 2015, coal production declined by over 177,000,000 tons across the country. From 2009 to 2015, over 600 coal mines closed. 


2/28/17: President Trump signed an executive order rolling back a controversial water rule opposed by farmer, rancher and home builder groups who all claimed it was killing jobs.


​3/16/17: Employed Americans are quitting their jobs at the fastest pace in 16 years in another sign that under President Donald Trump, confidence across the U.S. economy is rising. People quitting their jobs in droves is seen as a sign of confidence among workers, as folks are unlikely to quit a job unless they are confident they can get another one.


3/27/17: Trump signed a legislation rolling back Obama-era regulations. "I will keep working with Congress, with every agency, and most importantly, the American people, until we eliminate every unnecessary, harmful and job-killing regulation that we can find," Trump said at a White House signing ceremony.


​​​5/10/17: Manufacturing job openings rose to 394,000 in March, the Department of Labor reported, matching the highest level since April of 2006.


5/11/17: U.S. jobless claims hit lowest level in more than 28 years.


​​6/1/16:  The unemployment rate continues to fall under President Trump and is now at a 16 year low at 4.3%


6/15/17: President Trump signed an executive order to help expand apprenticeships and vocational programs across the U.S. Mr. Trump called it a moment to "celebrate the dignity of work and the greatness of the American worker.". The order would direct the secretary of Labor to develop a process that would encourage private businesses to develop apprenticeship programs as well as establish a business leaders task force on apprenticeships.


8/3/17:  The U.S. economy created 209,000 jobs in July, vs 183,000 jobs expected


​8/5/17: The number of employed Americans hit a record high of 153,513,000.


8/10/17: U.S. job openings surge to a record high.


​8/19/17: Trump signed an executive order to roughly double to $200 million the taxpayer money spent on learn-to-earn programs. The money would come from existing job training programs. The executive order would leave it to industry to design apprenticeships under broad standards to be set by the Labor Department. This order was meant to fill some of the 6 million open jobs in the U.S. Companies have long complained that they can’t find trained people to fill highly technical jobs, and apprenticeship programs have sprung up around the country. Companies now have to register with the Labor Department and adhere to government guidelines


 



.